FAQ

What is the difference between a burr grinder and blade grinder?

The easiest way to explain what a burr grinder is, is to explain the difference between it and a blade grinder.

A blade grinder is what my mother was using all those years ago, with a blade in the center of the grinder that looks like a propeller, similar to a blender blade.

A burr grinder, however, is exactly what you would find in a vintage manual coffee grinder at an estate sale or your grandmother’s house. It is made up of two revolving abrasive surfaces (called burrs), in between which the coffee is ground, a few beans at a time.

There are flat burr grinders and conical burr grinders, but they do the same thing: Grind your coffee, and grind it well. The distance between the surfaces can be changed, which in turn will change the size of the grind.

The reason that coffee aficionados tend to choose burr grinders over blade is that the beans are ground in a uniform size, giving you more control over the grind than you do with a blade. A uniform ground is much harder to do in a blade grinder, especially if you are trying to do a coarser ground, which is why burr grinders are wholeheartedly recommended for anyone doing French press or pour overs.

How to clean the grinder?

Any burr grinder will retain several grams of coffee in the burrs. The larger the grinder, the more grinds it will retain. This isn’t a problem for a coffee shop that grinds new coffee every minute, but can become an issue for a home user as the old grinds stale and negatively impact the flavour. So keep your machine as clean as possible and flush a few grams of beans through the machine if you haven’t used it in a while or if you’re switching coffees. You can clean your burrs easily by running instant rice through the machine.

What can be juiced in a juicer?

1. Apples

Antioxidant packed, these are one of the best fruits for juicing. They help to reduce cholesterol, cleanse digestive system and help to boost the immune system. They go well with almost any fruit or vegetable (softening any bitter or strong juice), making them my favorite base for juices. They are also chock full of nutrients that help aid in digesting fats.

2. Pineapples

Pineapples add a great tropical flavor to juices. They are anti-inflammatory, antiviral and antibacterial. They help to dissolved blood clots. They also contain a digestive enzyme called bromelain with is really important for the body to digest protein.

3. Papaya

Papaya is at the top of the list of the best fruits and vegetables when it comes to digestion. It contains papain, an enzyme that helps to breakdown protein. If you have digestion problems, try juicing some papaya juice daily, especially after meals. You don’t need a lot, but adding any type of mint to your papaya juice will strengthen the properties even more. Papayas also help to replenish vitamin C in the body, and protects against cancer. Note: Papaya doesn't juice well in a juicer, however, it works great for blender drinks and smoothies. 

4. Tomatoes

Tomatoes are popular and are at the top for best fruits and vegetables to juice. They are fantastic for your health. Tomatoes lower your risk of cancer (especially testicular cancer in men) and is good for the heart due to its high amount of lycopene. They blend very well with many vegetables and are pleasant tasting. When cooked, they become acidic, so if tomato sauce bothers you, don’t assume that juice would do the same. It’s completely different when it’s raw.

Are Bottled and Fresh Juice the Same?

Then there’s the question of whether bottled, pasteurized juice is the same nutritionally as freshly squeezed juice. Bottled juice has usually been heat-treated to pasteurize it. This kills potentially harmfully bacteria, but also degrades some — but definitely not all — of the nutrients in juice. Additionally, as juice is stored, it can lose more of its nutrients. Still, studies have shown that even some processed juices (such as cloudy apple juice, Concord grape juice and orange juice) have high levels of health-promoting antioxidants. And tomato juice actually benefits from the high heat of bottling. Tomato juice has higher levels of lycopene than fresh tomatoes, since lycopene is actually more available to our bodies when processed

What is espresso?

Espresso is not type of coffee bean, or a type of roast. Espresso is simply a method, a way to brew coffee. In fact, any coffee can be brewed as espresso—though some types taste better than others.

Making espresso involves pushing hot water through a compact ‘puck’ of grounds at high pressure, usually at around 9 bar (9 times the atmospheric pressure at sea level). The reason you see bags of coffee labeled as espresso is either because its contents are pre-ground to a fine size that suits espresso brewing, or it is a blend that has been crafted to create a balance of flavors when brewed as espresso.

What about the heat and pressure of espresso machine?

All espresso machines utilize boilers containing a heating element that brings the water to the proper temperature. The pressure to pull a shot is generated by either a piston (found in older manual machines), steam power (in modern low-end machines), or a motor-driven pump. Commercial machines use a rotary pump that keeps constant pressure, whereas smaller machines use a vibration pump that generates pressure only as the shot is being pulled.